Natural Resources

Viewshed Restoration

With your help, arborist crews can continue to restore the Parkway’s famous overlooks. Your support will allow a highly trained crew to clear overgrown vegetation at designated vistas this fall.
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Volunteer Supplies & Training

By lending their time and talents, volunteers make the Blue Ridge Parkway a better and more beautiful place for everyone. With a gift, you can provide the supplies, training, and tools volunteers need to repair, rejuvenate, and improve multiple sites along the Blue Ridge Parkway.
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BIPOC (Black, Indigenous, People of Color) Conservation Corps Trail Crew

You can give eight young adults a once-in-a-lifetime outdoor experience. Through a collaboration with the Conservation Corps of North Carolina, your gift will provide trail restoration training and additional support for an eight-person crew. The team will spend 14 weeks rehabbing the Tanawha Trail near Julian Price Memorial Park.
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Trails & Views Forever Program

As the National Park Service faces an astonishing price tag to repair all aspects of the Blue Ridge Parkway, coupled with impending budget constraints, care of the trails, campgrounds, picnic areas, and overlooks are falling to the bottom of the long list of priorities. That means, the places you enjoy nature on the Parkway desperately need your help!
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I Love Craggy Matching Challenge

A rehabilitation project for one of the most popular trails along the Blue Ridge Parkway is underway! A crew with the American Conservation Experience is repairing Craggy Flats Bald Trail, which has become deeply rutted, leading to erosion.
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Craggy Flats Bald Trail Repairs

FUNDED! Thank you for your gifts to make this project a reality. A crew with the American Conservation Experience has just finished most of the repairs at Craggy Flats Bald Trail during a four-week stint.
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Wildlife Cameras & Citizen Science - FUNDED!

FUNDED! We are happy to announce that this projects is fully funded.  Since the Foundation’s initial funding of remote wildlife cameras in 2009, the devices have captured more than 25,000 images of over 35 species of wildlife, including black bears, bobcats, coyotes, red and gray foxes, elk, European wild hogs, white-tail deer, and numerous other species on the Blue Ridge Parkway. The infrared cameras are a valuable tool for resource managers in their efforts to survey and oversee larger animals, especially predator species, on Parkway land.
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